WHAT CAUSES BDD? CONCLUDING THOUGHTS

Saturday, March 12, 2011 | 3:11 am

A complex chain of steps is likely required for BDD to develop. As appears to be the case for many, if not most, psychiatric disorders—as well as medical diseases—BDD probably results from a combination of factors. There is no one single cause. Genetic and neurobiological factors likely lay the groundwork for BDD, and psychological and sociocultural factors may also,, contribute. Symptoms most likely result from a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors that create a circuitous pathway from the underlying genes to BDD symptoms.

Neurobiological factors probably provide a template for BDD, making the process of preoccupation, excessive worry, and ritualistic behaviors possible. This process likely involves serotonin, other brain neurotransmitters, and certain brain structures. Perhaps neurobiological and genetic factors also increase risk for BDD by conferring an unusual sensitivity to the effect of stressful life events or negative comments about appearance.

Sociocultural and psychological factors—including personality traits, certain life experiences, and cultural values—probably combine with this biologically based vulnerability to further increase the risk of developing BDD. Such factors might also influence the content of BDD preoccupations—for example, the exact location of the perceived defect. It’s possible that evolutionary factors may also influence the content of BDD concerns, as reflected by the high rate of concerns with symmetry and skin blemishes. If BDD and OCD are eventually shown to have similar neurobiological underpinnings, might psychological or environmental factors influence whether BDD, as opposed to OCD, develops? For example, if a family member gets ill, might you be more likely to develop worries about illness and germs (OCD), whereas if you’re teased about your hair, might this channel your obsessive tendencies into BDD?

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WHAT CAUSES BDD? CONCLUDING THOUGHTSA complex chain of steps is likely required for BDD to develop. As appears to be the case for many, if not most, psychiatric disorders—as well as medical diseases—BDD probably results from a combination of factors. There is no one single cause. Genetic and neurobiological factors likely lay the groundwork for BDD, and psychological and sociocultural factors may also,, contribute. Symptoms most likely result from a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors that create a circuitous pathway from the underlying genes to BDD symptoms.Neurobiological factors probably provide a template for BDD, making the process of preoccupation, excessive worry, and ritualistic behaviors possible. This process likely involves serotonin, other brain neurotransmitters, and certain brain structures. Perhaps neurobiological and genetic factors also increase risk for BDD by conferring an unusual sensitivity to the effect of stressful life events or negative comments about appearance.Sociocultural and psychological factors—including personality traits, certain life experiences, and cultural values—probably combine with this biologically based vulnerability to further increase the risk of developing BDD. Such factors might also influence the content of BDD preoccupations—for example, the exact location of the perceived defect. It’s possible that evolutionary factors may also influence the content of BDD concerns, as reflected by the high rate of concerns with symmetry and skin blemishes. If BDD and OCD are eventually shown to have similar neurobiological underpinnings, might psychological or environmental factors influence whether BDD, as opposed to OCD, develops? For example, if a family member gets ill, might you be more likely to develop worries about illness and germs (OCD), whereas if you’re teased about your hair, might this channel your obsessive tendencies into BDD?*202\204\8*

—admin
(posted in Anti Depressants-Sleeping Aid)

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